Becoming a Nurse Scientist: The Critical Role of Mentorship, Collaboration, and Foundational Experiences as a Graduate Student

  • Shelley Doucet Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing & Health Sciences University of New Brunswick Saint John Adjunct Professor, Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick Affiliate Professor, University of British Columbia
Keywords: Science, Scientist, Benefits, Collaboration, Mentor, Graduate Student

Abstract

This article is a narrative of my journey to becoming a nurse scientist, which began as an undergraduate student in nursing. Throughout this paper, I share the ingredients that have been critical to my success as a new scientist, how my past and present perceptions of the role of a scientist have evolved, and the personal benefits I have experienced in this role. I conclude with a summary of how I perceive the scientific work that I do contributes to knowledge and society. Overall, my mentors, collaborative networks, and foundational experiences as a graduate student have laid the foundation for my career as a new scientist and have prepared me to conduct multi-method intersectoral research, which I believe is critical to informing health policy.

Author Biography

Shelley Doucet, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing & Health Sciences University of New Brunswick Saint John Adjunct Professor, Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick Affiliate Professor, University of British Columbia
Dr. Shelley Doucet isĀ an Assistant Professor in Nursing at the University of New Brunswick in Saint John, an Adjunct Professor with Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, and an Affiliate Professor with the University of British Columbia.
Published
2014-01-07
Section
Commentary